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Authors: Ben Jones, Kelvin Fichter

And a very special thank you to vi, Li Xuanji, David Knott, Eva Beylin, Vitalik Buterin, and Kasima Tharnpipitchai for invaluable contributions to putting this together.

We propose an alternative to confirmation signatures and (semi) formalize the properties of any valid Plasma MVP exit game. Our game provides significantly improved UX at the cost of a two-period challenge-response scheme in the worst case.

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requires that exits be processed in priority order. Each exit references an unspent transaction output, and priority is determined by the age of the transaction output. This is generally necessary so that valid exits can be processed before exits stemming from invalid “out of nowhere” transactions. More information about exit priority can be found at the OmiseGO research repository here 23 .

This post introduces a new way to calculate exit priority, which we call “youngest-input” priority. Instead of ordering exits by the age of the output , we now order exits by the age of the youngest input . This has the effect that exits of outputs, even if they’re included in withheld blocks after “out of nowhere” transactions, will be correctly processed as long as they only stem from valid inputs.

Plasma MVP also introduces an exit game, whereby some outputs are deemed “exitable”. This game correctly incentivizes parties to challenge a “non-exitable” output. For example, spent outputs are considered “non-exitable.” The game requires the exitor to place a bond, such that anyone who knows the output to be spent is sufficiently incentivized to reveal the transaction and take the bond.

The basic exit game has one challenge condition - outputs must not be spent. This condition is enough to make the exit game complete because of a construction of confirmation signatures. Basically, both parties to a transaction must “sign off” on a transaction’s inclusion in the chain. Honest clients won’t sign off on withheld (and therefore possibly invalid) transactions, so honest clients won’t accept funds that might be stolen by the operator (discussed more below).

Without confirmation signatures, the above exit game is exploitable by the operator in two ways:

Our new exit game solves these problems without confirmation signatures.

This proposal replaces output-age priority with something we call “youngest-input” priority. Basically, the exit priority of an output is now the age of its youngest input. We claim that this construction is safe (honest clients cannot have money stolen) as long as clients don’t spend any outputs included after any invalid or witheld transaction.

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Representing the 33rd District of California
June 29, 2018
Press Release

Today, Congressman Ted W. Lieu (D-Los Angeles County) led a letter of 51 Members calling for the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General to open an investigation regarding reports that asylum-seekers are being turned away at the U.S.-Mexico border before being referred to an asylum officer. They also expressed dismay at Trump Administration policies that could compel families to choose between pursuing legal asylum claims or being reunited and then deported.

It has become increasingly evident that the Department of Homeland Security is turning away individuals seeking asylum at U.S. ports of entry. In May 2017, Human Rights First published a report that documented 125 cases of families and individuals who were denied an opportunity to pursue their asylum claims at a port of entry. This month, The Washington Post reported a story of a Guatemalan father and son who were blocked from the port of entry on the Paso del Norte Bridge at the Texas border. In some cases families are turned back because the agency purportedly lacks sufficient resources to process them. In other instances it appears that CBP officers are simply hostile to migrants, falsely telling them that the United States is not welcoming asylum seekers.

Further troubling are reports that CBP officers have improperly evaluated asylum claims or have forced asylum seekers to recant their fears. The aforementioned Human Rights First report alleges that CBP officers have falsely indicated on forms that certain individuals have not expressed a fear of return, writing instead that they have come to the United States for work. The organization also documented a case in which CBP officers repeatedly pressured a Mexican woman to recant her fear of return and indicated she would not be granted asylum. CBP officers are not trained in asylum law and should not be evaluating asylum claims. They should instead refer asylum seekers to United States Citizenship and Immigration Services asylum officers; however, it appears that too often CBP agents fail to refer these cases.

Finally, we are worried by the recently-announced Department of Homeland Security fact sheet about zero-tolerance prosecution and family reunification. This document states that parents who are being deported may request to have their child accompany them. This policy will likely encourage detained parents to drop not only their own but also their children’s asylum claims in hope of being reunited. Families should never have to choose between reunification and their legal right to seek refuge in this country.

We urge you to immediately open an investigation into the Department of Homeland Security’s potentially illegal treatment of asylum seekers at the southwest border, including the denial of access to asylum procedures, the pressure to recant fears of return and the implementation of a policy that incentivizes asylum seekers to forfeit their claims in order to be reunited with their children.

A Hospice Palliative Care Charlotte Region Blog
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Docs, we oweyou! »

Challenging preconceived notions

by Everett Warren, UNC School of Medicine, Class of 2016

I wonder how often it has been said that life is precious. So often we are inundated with this idea. Life is fleeting, not guaranteed, short. What I have come to understand through my experiences with both palliative care and hospice is that what lies on the other side of life is just as precious. That is, death itself is precious. In some regards the process of dying demands more respect, honesty, and bravery than that of living. The amount of audacity it takes for an individual to accept their inevitable fate, decide that comfort is more important than treatment, and approach their last breath with peace is quite possibly the most admirable and beautiful human act I have had the privilege of witnessing. I do not believe I fully understood this concept prior to my palliative care and hospice experiences, and honestly, I believe this is largely because I was intimidated by the idea of death and having conversations about death, especially the idea of having a conversation about an individual’s death with that individual.

Our society discourages us from thinking about death. From a very young age we are bombarded with the idea that death is morbid, dark, and off-limits. This institutionalized mindset that death is taboo is hard to overcome, something I think I found personally challenging about this experience. I realized that a patient is only going to be as comfortable in discussing their death as you are comfortable in discussing it with him or her. While spending time with Hospice Palliative Care Charlotte Region clinicians, I had the privilege of witnessing what I thought would be impossible conversations conducted multiple times with a wide variety of patients from all walks of life. Each time, I was taken aback at how comfortable not only the physician or nurse was at leading this conversation, but also at how well the patient responded. Yes, there were definitely patients and family members that were tearful and clearly upset. Yes, there were moments when the patient would verbalize how unfair the situation was or how angry they were at the circumstances. Yes, there were moments where it seemed like there was no right way to answer the questions the patient and their family were asking. However, what was most apparent was that the patient, the patient’s family, and the hospice or palliative care physician were working together as one team with the same goals. It was truly inspiring to see a physician take on a patient’s situation as their own in such a sincere and empathetic way while being so available for the patient. I truly saw empathy go beyond what I thought possible during these two short days. I aspire to live out empathy as a medical student, resident, and physician in the ways in which I saw it manifested during these two days.

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Gehl —Copenhagen

Vesterbrogade 24, 5th floor

1620 Copenhagen V

Denmark

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1211 Folsom Street, 4th floor

San Francisco

California 94103

USA

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137 2 nd Avenue

New York

NY 10003

USA